Advertisement
 

doctorslounge.com

 
Powered by
Careerbuilder

 

                    Home  |  Forums  |  Humor  |  Advertising  |  Contact
   Ask a Doctor

   News via RSS

   Newsletter

   Oncology

   News

 

 Conferences


   CME

   Forum Archives

   Diseases

   Symptoms

   Labs

   Procedures

   Drugs

   Links
   Specialties

   Cardiology

   Dermatology

   Endocrinology

   Fertility

   Gastroenterology

   Gynecology

   Hematology

   Infections

   Nephrology

   Neurology

   Oncology

   Orthopedics

   Pediatrics

   Pharmacy

   Primary Care

   Psychiatry

   Pulmonology

   Rheumatology

   Surgery

   Urology

   Other Sections

   Membership

   Research Tools

   Medical Tutorials

   Medical Software

 

 Headlines:

 
 

Back to index

ICE regimen

Abstract: Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide: a highly effective cytoreduction and peripheral-blood progenitor-cell mobilization regimen for transplant-eligible patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

PURPOSE: To evaluate a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of ifosfamide administered as an infusion with bolus carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) supported by granuloctye colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for cytoreduction and stem-cell mobilization in transplant-eligible patients with primary refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred sixty-three transplant-eligible patients with relapsed or primary refractory NHL were treated from October 1993 to December 1997 with ICE chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Administration of three cycles of ICE chemotherapy was planned at 2-week intervals. Peripheral-blood progenitor cells were collected after cycle 3, and all patients who achieved a partial response (PR) or complete response (CR) to ICE chemotherapy were eligible to proceed to transplantation. Event-free and overall survival, ICE-related toxicity, and the number of CD34(+) cells collected after treatment with ICE and G-CSF were evaluated. RESULTS: All 163 patients were assessable for response, and there was no treatment-related mortality. A major response (CR/PR) was evident in 108 patients (66.3%); 89% of the responding patients underwent successful transplantation. Patient who underwent transplantation and achieved a CR to ICE had a superior overall survival to that of patients who achieved a PR (65% v 30%; P =.003). The median number of CD34(+) cells/kg collected was 8.4 x 10(6). The dose-limiting toxicity of ICE was hematologic, with 29.4% of patients developing grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia. There were minimal nonhematologic side effects. CONCLUSION: ICE chemotherapy, with ifosfamide administered as a 24-hour infusion to decrease CNS side effects, and the substitution of carboplatin for cisplatin to minimize nephrotoxicity, is a very effective cytoreduction and mobilization regimen in patients with NHL. Furthermore, the quality of the clinical response to ICE predicts for posttransplant outcome.

References

Moskowitz CH, Bertino JR, Glassman JR, Hedrick EE, Hunte S, Coady-Lyons N, Agus DB, Goy A, Jurcic J, Noy A, O'Brien J, Portlock CS, Straus DS, Childs B, Frank R, Yahalom J, Filippa D, Louie D, Nimer SD, Zelenetz AD. Ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide: a highly effective cytoreduction and peripheral-blood progenitor-cell mobilization regimen for transplant-eligible patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. J Clin Oncol. 1999 Dec;17(12):3776-85.

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a doctor or a nurse?

Do you want to join the Doctors Lounge online medical community?

Participate in editorial activities (publish, peer review, edit) and give a helping hand to the largest online community of patients.

Click on the link below to see the requirements:

Doctors Lounge Membership Application


Regimen

Ifosfamide....... 5000 mg / M2 CIV X 24 hr day 2
Mesna....... 5000 mg / M2 CIV X 24 hr day 2
Carboplatin....... AUC 5 IV day 2
VP-16....... 100 mg / M2 IV days 1-3
FREQUENCY every 21 days.

     
  Summary  
  Overall Response Rate  
  Progression Free Survival  
  Overall Survival  
  Toxicity  
     

Article reviewed by:

Dr. Tamer Fouad, M.D.

 

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 



We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the HON Foundation. Click to verify.
We subscribe to the HONcode principles. Verify here

Privacy Statement | Terms & Conditions | Editorial Board | About us
Copyright 2001-2012 DoctorsLounge. All rights reserved.